Drum roll please – for the 21 designs

Water for Riley proudly presents the ACAD and SAIT student designs in the running for the drinking fountain design challenge. They are available for viewing and comments at Blank Page Studio until April 24, 2016. Stop by and add your comments.

These photos are no substitute for seeing the whole collection in the studio space. Please visit and leave your opinions on the page beside each design. No page at Blank Page need be left blank.

And now, in no particular order, the long list of 21 student designs, before the short list is chosen

balloons– ta dum da dum –

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To participate in Water for Riley, email or call 403 862 1923. To donate through the Parks Foundation, please click the button and specify your donation is for the Water for Riley project.
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Cumulative impacts of Water for Riley

Two good questions
1. Why didn’t the City of Calgary install a drinking fountain in Riley Park instead of this lengthy, volunteer-driven, Water for Riley process?

2. What makes Water for Riley’s drinking fountain costly?

Both questions came up as the 21 amazing designs shine in the exhibit at Blank Page Studio during the This Is My City Festival from April 7 to 24, 2016.

The answer to both excellent questions is similar: Water for Riley wants more than obtaining a squat concrete public drinking fountain. The jargon for our vision is cumulative impacts. A beautiful, artistic fountain was the mechanism for attaining those cumulative impacts.

Now for the long answers.

  1. Why not a plain, simple drinking fountain?
    A drinking fountain in Riley Park is an unfunded priority. More jargon meaning there’s no money and won’t be money in the City of Calgary budget although Riley Park’s need for drinking water is known. If there were money for it, the drinking fountain would have one nozzle without regard to users’ disabilities, height differences, artistic merit to attract visitors, canine needs, or the other criteria the college students considered in their thoughtful designs. And no cumulative impacts:

    photo: www.theparkcatalog.com
    photo with permission: www.theparkcatalog.com

    We will have fixed costs no matter which design is selected to build: Buy the structure for $$, transport it to Riley Park for $$$, dig a trench for $$$, pour a foundation for $, install hook up to waterline for $$, cover trench for $$, and turn on the water for $. The City’s estimate for installing any fountain is $20,000.00

If we have to fundraise for a plain, simple fountain, we saw an opportunity to acquire a beautiful, student designed, drinking fountain and forge new and strengthen existing networks of relationships, establish connections among neighbouring institutions, and build community.

In the past 100+ years, Riley Park’s neighbours didn’t collaborate if they had an idea to share, a problem to solve, or an interest in common. Water for Riley wants Riley Park’s neighbours to get acquainted and build social capital together. Social capital creates trust, and trusting neighbourhoods have less crime, higher energy, more caring, and better economies.

We’ve already achieved some cumulative impacts
These are quotes from our conversations with Water for Riley’s partners:

School Administrator: “We’ve always wanted to work with the colleges and never had a reason to call them.”

ACAD Administrator: “I’ve been looking for an excuse to call my counterpart at SAIT.”

Faculty member at ACAD: “My students are so excited about this opportunity to work on a real project in the community.”

Faculty member at SAIT: “The students had a bidding war for the chance to work on Water for Riley instead of the other projects we offered them.”

ACAD Student: “None of my other classmates had a chance to work with a real client and solve a real world design problem like we’ve had with Water for Riley.”

SAIT Student: “Water for Riley is a valuable part of my learning about how to apply design to the world around me.”

This Is My City Art Society partner: “Water for Riley is a true community based, volunteer driven project. It’s exciting to be a part of it.”

Students at both Colleges admitted that, until Water for Riley, they’d never wandered down the hill to see the natural jewel of an urban park at ACAD and SAIT’s feet.

The last word on cumulative impacts goes to Hillhurst Sunnyside Community Association: “As the nearest neighbour to Riley Park, the HSCA is inundated with park visitors asking to use our building’s facilities. Water for Riley provides needed water, and enhances HSCA’s mandate of increased volunteerism and community engagement. HSCA had no relationship at all with ACAD or SAIT prior to this initiative. When neighbours identify projects that better our community, the whole community, present and future, becomes more resilient, adaptive and resourceful. The lessons learned through this project are transferable and trans-generational. Projects such as this demand the attention of funders, to collectively encourage and promote grassroots innovation that strengthens neighborhoods to overcome complex challenges in the future. Our employees come and go, but stories of residents turning ideas into action live on for decades. This initiative will be inspirational to many, and will serve as a roadmap for what can be accomplished through multi-partner collaborations in a community.”

2. Budget: What does Water for Riley’s fountain cost?

How much do shoes cost? It depends on design, materials, labour, etc. After our jury selects a design we’ll know. Our best guesstimate to build an artistic fountain is somewhere between $40,000.00 and $60,000.00, about double the cost of a plain fountain, not including installation costs.

We anticipate incidental costs of $7,000.00 for the design selection process, $5,000 of which is for technical expertise to review the short list of designs for feasibility, durability and affordability.

So far, we’ve had no (zero, nada) administration costs or incidentals. Everything has been donated; meeting and display spaces, lunches, photocopies, and time volunteered. Framed on Fifth donated the posters for all the exhibits. The wonderful Diana designed our fabulous logo, named Water for Riley, and constructed this website. Here is our still-expanding list of incredible partners.partners logos as of 2016-04-06We’re very grateful for all, and hope this answers some questions. All questions, comments and offers to help are welcome. Email or call 403 862 1923.

To donate to the fountain project through the Parks Foundation click the button and specify your donation is for Water for Riley.donate button

 

 

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The 21 designs are ready for their close up

27 student designers (19 from Alberta College of Art + Design‘s first year Object Design class and eight from Southern Alberta Institute of Technology‘s Capstone Projects) were challenged to design an artistic drinking fountain for Riley Park.

One design will be chosen for installation near Riley Park’s popular children’s playground.

On April 7, 2016, all 21 designs debut together.

Tell us what you like about each design when you visit the exhibit at Blank Page Studio (1221B Kensington Road NW, Calgary, 2nd floor, entrance left of the mural) as part of This Is My City Festival.partners logos as of 2016-04-06Follow Water for Riley for updates: Twitter @waterforriley
Please contribute to our beautiful drinking fountain project through the Parks Foundation and specify your support is for Water for Riley.donate button

Purposes of the Water for Riley Project:

Riley Park’s nine hectares boast a cricket pitch, playground, wading pool, wooded areas, gorgeous memorial gardens, and open areas for rest, sports and picnics. Riley Park encourages activities for children. Yet Riley Park lacks facilities, such as drinking water. As an historic jewel among Calgary’s parks, Riley Park deserves an artistic drinking fountain. The volunteer committee believes success comes from community and builds community.

The Water for Riley Project is based on five principles:

  1. Health: Thirsty visitors must leave, or bring bottled, sweet, or caffeinated drinks. Safe, sustainably delivered water on site shows a caring, welcoming community.
  2. Environment: Discarded disposable cups and bottles litter the trash, bushes, and fence line. It’s an unsustainable waste of resources when a fountain would refill reusable containers.
  3. Community building: This project brings together the park’s neighbours for the first time in a century. The Hillhurst/Sunnyside Community Association, Hillhurst School, This Is My City Art Society, City of Calgary, local businesses and residents are involved. ACAD and SAIT students experienced a design challenge the Calgary Foundation funded.
  4. Economic well-being: Attractions attract. The Kensington businesses work hard to make our community a visitors’ destination. An artistic drinking fountain supports that goal.
  5. Other collective benefits of this project to our community and Calgary include:
  • connect people to place in an inner city destination,
  • increase energy for volunteerism and community engagement,
  • facilitate being in nature in a dense urban space and increase environmental awareness,
  • share knowledge of Riley Park as a designated historic resource,
  • inspire students,
  • encourage eyes on the street and crime reduction with families in the park,
  • join the international Blue Community Framework of water as a human right
  • the thrill of beautiful design instead of a concrete block public drinking fountain.