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Need accessible drinking water

Water for Riley understands the Riders fans’ complaints (see story below). Please support a public drinking fountain for Riley Park. This important quote tells the consequence of no access to drinking water, when 21 fans became ill at a game.

Gerald Heinrichs sent letters to the Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region’s senior medical health officer and the province’s chief medical health officer suggesting dehydration accounted for the injuries. He believes the lack of water fountains at Mosaic Stadium poses a serious public health risk and the facility should not be permitted to hold events until it is remedied.

Be part of it;
a beautiful public drinking fountain,
for Riley Park, for you and as a legacy for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

Here’s the full story:

Fans pan shortage of drinking fountains
as mercury hits 35 C during Riders game

A fan who complained to health officials in Regina is questioning whether Mosaic Stadium operators are willfully restricting public water access so they can sell water for profit.

 In the aftermath of a REGINA scorching hot Saskatchewan Roughriders game on July 29 when 21 fans were treated for heat-related symptoms, the City of Regina and Evraz Place are discussing an extreme weather plan for all events at Mosaic Stadium.

Fans were hot about the lack of water fountains at the stadium on a day when the mercury registered 35 degrees at kickoff.

“We’re looking at having … an extreme weather plan that could be implemented when temperatures rise above or below a certain temperature,” said Kim Onrait, executive director of city services and major projects.

“If the forecast would be similar to what we saw that particular day, then they would have a plan that they would implement, which could very well be bringing in portable water filling stations for people to access.”

Of the 21 fans who became ill, two required transport to hospital and six were managed by St. John Ambulance.

The majority of those affected required fluids and cooling by paramedics and were then released.

Gerald Heinrichs sent letters to the Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region’s senior medical health officer and the province’s chief medical health officer suggesting dehydration accounted for the injuries. He believes the lack of water fountains at Mosaic Stadium poses a serious public health risk and the facility should not be permitted to hold events until it is remedied.

“This stadium brings in 30,000 to 35,000 people and they had no reasonable access to public water,” Heinrichs said.

The design of the stadium was done by PCL and their subcontracting group.

“When they build a facility like this, they build it to meet national building codes and that’s the way this stadium was designed,” Onrait said. “We have received a permanent occupancy permit for the stadium, which says that we have met all of the health inspections and we’ve also met the national building code requirements.”

Heinrichs questions if the stadium operators are willfully restricting public water access so they can sell water for profit.

“It is important that we work … to ensure that eventgoers have the right information about what they’re allowed to bring into the stadium,” Onrait said.

Patrons attending events at Mosaic Stadium are permitted to bring sealed water bottles no larger than one litre, as well as empty refillable containers with a one-litre maximum capacity. There is no limit on the number of sealed water bottles or refillable containers allowed at Mosaic Stadium.

“A lot of stadiums restrict bringing in water or containers, they have higher restrictions on those items than Mosaic actually has,” Onrait said.

He discourages fans from filling water bottles from sinks in washrooms.

“The hot and cold water come into a single line just before the tap and hot water can carry contaminants in it, so we don’t recommend that people resort to doing that,” Onrait said.

At Investors Group Field in Winnipeg, there are six water fountains and four portable water dispensers. There is no charge to refill water bottles. The Winnipeg stadium, which has 33,234 seats that can be expanded to 40,000, hosted its first game in 2013.

McMahon Stadium in Calgary has no water fountains or bottle refill stations. However, fans can bring in bottled water and fill bottles with potable water at any of the sinks in the washrooms of the 57-year-old stadium. The Calgary stadium seats 35,400.

There are eight combination water fountains/bottle refill stations at Tim Hortons Field in Hamilton. Opening in 2014, the stadium has 22,500 seats.

At TD Place in Ottawa, there are water fountains and refillable stations in all public areas and water in the bathrooms is drinkable everywhere in the 24,000-seat stadium.

Fans are also permitted to bring in empty drink containers for CFL games so they can refill inside or bring in sealed water bottles.

This stadium brings in 30,000 to 35,000 people and they had no reasonable access to public water.

What happens to bottles and cans discarded in Riley Park?

Environmental stewardship remains an obvious goal

Disposable cans and bottles are discarded in Riley Park’s trash, and litter the fence and bushes. It’s an unsustainable waste of resources, which doesn’t fit with W4R’s five guiding goals:

1. Health, 2. Environment, 3. Community building, 4. Economic well being of local businesses, and 5. Other collective benefits.

For some time, W4R has attempted to find out (1) how much garbage is collected at Riley Park, and,  (2) how much of that is disposable drink containers that could be recycled. We learned that garbage collection is contracted out, so no records are available to answer either question.

The reasons for wanting that data

Although the amount of garbage is visible, having numbers, such as garbage weight or bag count carted out weekly, is very helpful in making a case for funding the drinking fountain, and for raising awareness of the issues of waste.

What we did learn, is that City of Calgary staff take the initiative on their own. If staff find recyclables in the park, they can and often do collect them.

What do they do with the refunds they collect from Riley Park’s disposable bottles and cans? According to Leanne, the refund from any cans and bottles is donated to the Parks staff fund.

W4R is pleased that Riley Park’s waste doesn’t go to waste.

Leanne, City of Calgary Parks Department, works in Riley Park

Be part of it;
a beautiful public drinking fountain,
for Riley Park, for you and as a legacy for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

 

 

Nice drinking fountain design; will it work?

The Calgary Foundation Neighbours Grant

When Water for Riley (W4R) was just an idea without a name, two community members met with Julie Black, The Calgary Foundation’s fantastic Citizen Engagement Associate. From the start, Julie and The Calgary Foundation (TCF) provided financial support as well as excellent advice, encouragement, and other opportunities.

Julie Black and Deborah Sword, volunteer Project Manager of W4R.

Once again, we are excited and delighted to announce that TCF has awarded us a Neighbours Grant to fund the building of the drinking fountain’s prototype. W4R and the fundraising committee want to shout out our gratitude.

W4R is proud to partner with and accept support from The Calgary Foundation.

To find out how Reflecting Blooms works we’ll build it

Taking risks is how W4R achieved the success it’s had so far. Bring on the next challenge. With a winning design and a fundraising plan, we’ve retained a fabricator and mechanical engineer.

W4R relies on community volunteers. The next steps will rely on professionals. We are very pleased that the expert firms we’re working with have committed to contain costs, and to give us fixed, reasonable prices to move ahead in increments, as funds are available.

Next step is the design build

Design–build is a method to deliver a project.

“Design-build is intended to be a highly collaborative, fully integrated process that is built on trust, mutual respect, teamwork, innovation and creative problem solving. Design-build unleashes the power of team to deliver projects faster, better and for optimum cost – best value for the money, time and e ort invested. Owners find that when design-build is done right, their level of engagement with the entire team is more meaningful than is experienced with other delivery methods.” https://www.dbia.org

Be part of it;
a beautiful public drinking fountain,
for Riley Park, for you and as a legacy for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

 

Bow to Bluff, an ecosystem approach to nature

Riley Park is part of an ecosystem

In our mostly paved, urban landscape, it’s easy to forget the role of ecosystems in keeping us healthy. In nature, nothing exists in isolation. The health of one part of the ecosystem affects the health of all. On May 27, 2017, you can be part of an historic effort to pull fragmented pieces of land into a more useable, healthy space.

Bow to Bluff has an ecosystem perspective

Citizens saw an opportunity to transform fragmented bits of land leftover from Ctrain construction. The Ctrain tracks disrupt the McHugh Bluff, and chop up 9A Street N.W. streetscapes between SAIT/ACAD/Jubilee Station to Sunnyside Station, and to the Bow River. The citizens’ vision is to turn those neglected parcels and current back alley trails into a walkable, terrific public space.

Leftover bits of 9A St.N.W. after Ctrain construction can be usable public space.

The City of Calgary began working with the citizen group on the Bow (River) to (McHugh) Bluff initiative. Where now are tiny, weed and garbage-filled bits of land, imagine wondrous public spaces from the river, across Memorial Drive, past the Ctrain station, along the elevated tracks, to the top of the bluff.

Join us. Water for Riley will be there.

27 May, 2017, enjoy Kensington, Riley Park, and launch Bow to Bluff.

Water for Riley sits at the base of the McHugh Bluff. The Bow to Bluff initiative will help restore natural health to the ecosystem in which Riley Park is nestled.

Water for Riley works with Parks Foundation Calgary (parksfdn.com) and issues tax receipts for all donations over $10.00. Call 403 862 1923 for more information

 

Continuity and change

Water for Riley (W4R) has many moving pieces

How W4R works partly explains our successes so far. A few members of the organizing committee have been involved from the start. Other people have contributed skill and time as tasks required. W4R has been blessed with the right people offering the right skills at the right time.

On 27 April 2017, Jen Dobbin of The Dobbin Group met with Michelle Vincent and Natalie Back, stalwart W4R volunteers.

The Snowball Methodology

The method is called the Snowball. Like a small ball of snow rolling downhill that collects more snow as it gathers speed, we collect and network with people as we move forward. One person leads to more people. At every meeting W4R volunteers ask, for example:
who else should we talk to?
what contacts do you have that might introduce us?
when can we meet with those others?
where should we go for those connections?

We have a core committee that holds the vision and provides continuity. Fresh ideas and energy come from a cast of changing volunteers who share the vision and offer their time as they have some available.

Community minded people share contacts

Michelle and Annie MacInnis, Executive Director of Kensington Business Revitalization Zone (BRZ), met to discuss mutual interests on 10 May, 2017.

We’re very grateful for these cross-fertilizing, idea-sharing meetings. It’s like shortcuts on a long journey; we learn from their wisdom and experience so we don’t have to build a road they’ve already walked.

 You can join the snowball effect, even in Springtime

Follow this Water for Riley blog and on Twitter @waterforriley.

Please contribute to Riley Park’s beautiful drinking fountain project through the Parks Foundation and – at the instructions to seller page – specify that your contribution is for Water for Riley.

To volunteer call 403 862 1923.

 

Water for Riley presented at Annual General Meeting

Speaking to the bosses in public

Water for Riley has many bosses. At the Hillhurst Sunnyside Community Association (HSCA) Annual General Meeting (AGM) on April 25, most of those bosses were in the room.

Water for Riley presented its successes to date at the HSCA Annual General Meeting
Lisa Chong, Community Planning Coordinator, arranged Water for Riley display at AGM

The Chair of the HSCA Board of Directors, the Executive Director, the Chair of the Community Planning Committee, Councillor Druh Farrell, and the real bosses – residents and members of the community – expressed their approval of the winning design, congratulated student designer, Michelle Lazo, and encouraged the W4R organizing committee to keep going.

HSCA members and Board discussed community sustainability and other important issues

Water for Riley, as a project, fits in the goals and mission of the HSCA and community residents. The drinking fountain aims to achieve the shared community goals of sustainability and accessibility.

Councillor Druh Farrell, centre of front row, spoke about accessibility, development and good planning for growth.

 To stay in touch and receive updates

Follow this Water for Riley blog and on Twitter @waterforriley.

Please contribute to Riley Park’s beautiful drinking fountain project through the Parks Foundation and – at the instructions to seller page – specify that your contribution is for Water for Riley.

To volunteer call 403 862 1923.

 

W4R publicity and information sheet

Water for Riley moves into the spotlight

At three evening events in April, 2017, W4R is getting known beyond the local community. In preparation for the publicity, Michelle Vincent, Lead Volunteer, created this one page information sheet.

Thanks Michelle. W4R is ready for that close-up now.

Follow this Water for Riley blog and on Twitter @waterforriley for updates.

Please contribute to Riley Park’s beautiful drinking fountain project through the Parks Foundation and – at the instructions to seller page – specify that your contribution is for Water for Riley.

To volunteer call 403 862 1923.

W4R’s public display (of affection)

This is My City Festival going strong until April 27, 2017

Water for Riley (W4R) enjoys a long relationship with This is My City Art Society (TMC). Sally Truss, Executive Director of TMC, was at the first meeting that discussed W4R as a possibility. Sally organized and chaired the jury of experts who selected the winning drinking fountain design. Last year, before the jury made its decision, Sally arranged for the design display to be hung at Blank Page Studio.

All student designs again on display

Now, Sally has again included W4R in the 2017 TMC festival.

The 21 ACAD and SAIT student drinking fountain designs will be at the Louise Riley Branch, Calgary Public Library, for the duration of the TMC festival.

Please come to the festival and admire the students’ creativity.

photo credit Sally Truss.
photo credit Sally Truss.

W4R owes a lot to Sally, and thanks her sincerely as she departs from her TMC role to pursue her other and numerous projects.

W4R plans to keep Sally on the team. She’ll be part of the pitch, with Michelle Vincent and Michelle Lazo (the student designer), on 19 April as W4R presents its case to win audience votes.

Thanks Sally, for everything and for all you’ll continue to do with projects near to your heart.

Follow Water for Riley on Twitter @waterforriley for updates.

Please contribute to Riley Park’s beautiful drinking fountain project through the Parks Foundation and – at the instructions to seller page – specify that your contribution is for Water for Riley.

To volunteer call 403 862 1923.

 

 

Water for Riley expands its network

Bureaucracy can be confusing. Necessary and confusing.

The complexity of Water for Riley (W4R) is that it involves multiple municipal departments, such as Public Art, Heritage, Parks, Water Services, and Roads, and our elected City Councillor. W4R has been blessed with the quality of civic employees who have joined the W4R network. The W4R team includes competent and helpful City of Calgary staff.

Today, April 6, W4R volunteers met with another department. Not only did it enlarge W4R’s network of helpful City employees, the volunteers got a tour of the amazing Gold LEED building that sets a high standard of environmental sustainability in Calgary.

Amy Ross, Water Resources, and Michelle Vincent, W4R lead volunteer.

While on the tour, the art team gave an answer to the question: is the drinking fountain for Riley Park an art project or a functional project? “It sits in different worlds at the same time,” said Tristan Surtees. That answer sounds right.

Art team, Water Services

Later, the W4R volunteers changed roles to meet with the Calgary Foundation coach for Pitch Night. Priscilla Ng, Advisor, Donations, Royal Bank of Canada, gave so many great tips for how to pitch W4R to the voting audience on April 19. Between now and the pitch, W4R will be in overdrive in preparation and getting votes.

Priscilla Ng and Michelle Vincent enjoy Riley Park while discussing tips about pitching Water for Riley.
Priscilla is coach extraordinaire.

Call 403 862 1923 to get involved as another W4R volunteer. Click the link to donate to The Parks Foundation Calgary, and designate your gift to The Water for Riley Project. Tax receipts are issued.

 

Water for Riley in a grant contest

Hot off the press news

On 19 April, 2017, Water for Riley (W4R) will compete for a $10,000.00 Calgary Foundation, Soul of the City Neighbour Grant. As soon as the audience votes, the five winners will be announced.

Please buy a ticket to attend,
stay for the vote and support Water for Riley

Now, here are the details

W4R is honoured to be one of ten contestants in the Soul of the City pitch event. Grants will be awarded to the five groups with the most votes. W4R would so appreciate your support.

Thanks also to the CF, which has been a valued and appreciated W4R partner and supporter from the start. CF will supply food for attendees.

Please come and vote for Water for Riley.

Date: 19 April, 2017
Time: from 4:30 to 7:45 PM.
Location: John Dutton Theatre, Calgary Public Library,  downtown branch,
616 Macleod Trail S.E.
Calgary, AB T2G 2M2

Please buy your ticket for the event,
support Water for Riley with your vote

W4R’s volunteer fundraising committee is hard at work, doing its homework, collecting stories and preparing its prize winning presentation.

The Calgary Foundation describes this event:

Join us for the Soul of the City Neighbour Grants pitch night.

Hosted by crowd-favourite emcee Andrew Phung, 10 Neighbour Grant finalist groups will pitch their big ideas to the audience and a panel of “friendly dragons”. The audience will then vote and select the top 5 community groups to each receive a $10,000 Soul of the City Neighbour Grant, provided by Calgary Foundation and RBC Foundation.

This is our fourth annual Soul of the City Neighbour Grants pitch night and the event is always joyful and inspiring. Please join in. Your vote matters.

Wednesday, April 19, 2017
4:30 p.m – 7:45 p.m.
John Dutton Theatre – Central Library
$15.00

 

Your vote matters to W4R.
Please buy your ticket, come to the event,
and vote for Water for Riley