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Calgary winter, 2017-style

The holiday season is here

This is the winter scene that greeted Trail on his morning walk in Riley Park. (Not that there is much winter this December, 2017, as seen in the green background of the +15C record warm temperature.)

Trail and his BFF Jake, appreciate the holiday greeting from Anonymous Santa

To whoever took the time to make beautiful Riley Park
more festive with big bows this winter, thank you.

 

Season’s greetings and thank you from Water for Riley

Year’s end is a nostalgic time, and Water for Riley isn’t immune from the sentiment. 2017 marked some successes, some set-backs and lots of steps forward we’re proud to share. This year-end is a chance for huge thanks to all who made the drinking fountain in Riley Park manageable and close to reality.

Public art became a contentious issue in Calgary, with pushback from taxpayers and residents about the quality of art installations in public spaces. Water for Riley followed the debate with interest since the drinking fountain will be public art as well as a functional fountain. Water for Riley adhered to a different process than the Public Art Program. All 21 drinking fountain designs were displayed throughout the community in many venues, comments collected, and a professional jury of local residents specifically chosen for their expert credentials and their expertise in the neighbourhood. The transparent process resulted in a design that most residents accept.

Throughout the year’s many meetings, displays, marathon document writing sessions, and fundraising efforts, the organizing committee received and greatly appreciates the excellent guidance and advice from: IBI Group, Ron Buchan and Michelle Reid of City of Calgary Parks Department, The Calgary Foundation, The Parks Foundation of Calgary, Gena Rotstein of Place2Give Foundation, Hillhurst Sunnyside Community Association, Framed on Fifth, Sunnyside Natural Market, Nulli Identity Management, and Heavy Industries, Sally Truss, Michelle Vincent, Kerry Harmer, ACAD’s Marion Garden, among others. They worked hard to ensure the volunteers managing this grassroots project stayed on track.

To all donors, supporters, partners and friends, very warm greetings for a happy, healthy and prosperous 2018, from the volunteers of Water for Riley. See you in person, this summer, at the opening celebration of the drinking fountain in Riley Park.

If you donate to Water for Riley, you will receive a tax receipt from The Parks Foundation Calgary.

 

Updating neighbours on progress

Community engagement is Water for Riley’s core value

Water for Riley’s (W4R) volunteer organizing committee is committed to engaging a wide range of communities. It’s important to keep groups and individuals with an interest in Riley Park up to date on progress. We’re closing on the goal of getting a beautiful, functional, artistic drinking fountain for Riley Park’s active users.

This week W4R volunteers checked in with Riley Park neighbours

The Hillhurst Sunnyside Community Association (HSCA) has a new Executive Director, Karen Gallagher-Burt. W4R was happy to meet with Karen to introduce the project, and delighted that she was already well informed about it. Karen said: “Water for Riley is a very good news story.”

From the start, Water for Riley has been an ad hoc subcommittee of HSCA’s Community Planning Committee (CPC), reporting to the Chair of the CPC, Robert McKercher. Robert always gives sage advice, so it was nice to report on W4R’s status and get his feedback.

Karen Gallagher-Burt, E.D. of the HSCA, and Robert McKercher, Chair of the CPC
Karen Gallagher-Burt, E.D. of the HSCA, and Robert McKercher, Chair of the CPC, met with W4R volunteer, Deborah Sword.

This week W4R volunteers checked in with Riley Park future neighbours

The Grace Hospital, north of Riley Park’s 10 Ave N.W. boundary and East of 14 St. N.W., has been purchased for redevelopment. The owner now is Northwest Healthcare Properties (NWHP), with big plans for a mixed-use development on the site.

W4R met with Terry Schmitt, NWHP Regional General Manager, Western Canada, and Tracy Hume, NWHP Regional Property Manager. Terry and Tracy expressed their interest in being good neighbours in our great community, which is W4R’s interest also.

Terry Schmitt, and Tracy Hume of NWHP, and Michelle Vincent, Lead Volunteer of Water for Riley

This week W4R volunteers checked in with Riley Park municipal neighbours

On Feb 17, 2015, before Water for Riley was named or formed, its current volunteer Project Manager sent an email to Ron Buchan, City of Calgary Parks Department, and asked if there was any possibility of getting a drinking fountain in Riley Park. Ron answered right away and he’s been answering right away ever since. In fact, Ron has shown up every time W4R has needed and invited him.

Michelle Reid, Cultural Landscape Lead in the City of Calgary Parks Department, has consulted to W4R for over a year. She has always offered good counsel and excellent ideas, and encouraged the student designers.

On June 19, 2012, W4R’s current volunteer Project Manager sent an email to Councillor Druh Farrell asking about a drinking fountain design challenge with ACAD and SAIT. Druh answered right away that: “I think it’s a great idea… I’m also sending a note to Parks, … as Riley Park is a regional park and gets a huge amount of use.” Druh, who was recently re-elected in Ward 7, provided W4R with a letter of support early in the W4R process, and has brought attention to events through her good offices.

We reported on the current status of fundraising efforts and drinking fountain fabrication. The City of Calgary has been incredibly helpful to W4R  and it’s a pleasure to work with them.

Michelle Reid, Councillor Druh Farrell, Ron Buchan, Michelle Vincent, Lead Volunteer of Water for Riley

Keeping all the communities of interest connected is one of the most positive impacts of W4R. You are part of the community.

Be part of Calgary’s public art legacy;
for Riley Park, for you, and for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

 

Is the finish line in sight?

The two remaining tasks take shape

  1. Task #1 is fundraising to complete the drinking fountain project. We have had several interesting prospect meetings, and more are booked.
  2. Task #2 is project managing the fabrication of the drinking fountain.

Meanwhile, we continue engaging with W4R’s wonderful partners:

ACAD is exploring an opportunity, subject to its own resource pressures, which intrigues Water for Riley volunteers. 19 September, 2017, we met with new ACAD staff member, Marion Garden, and ACAD teacher and W4R champion, Kerry Harmer. Kerry shared the reasons that Riley Park matters and deserves a blockbuster, public art, drinking fountain. Marion was interested in the process W4R used to bring institutions together and build community around the project.

W4R’s story is so inspiring that Marion wants to help. Her idea is fascinating. From early in the project the community engagement process has been thick and rich, and ACAD videographers tagged alone with equipment. Huge, raw data files are now cached in ACAD’s computers. Marion is exploring how to cull the footage and shape the story of how students designed the drinking fountain. This will be a long term collaborative project for ACAD.

Marion and Kerry at ACAD meeting, 19 Sept 2017
Marion Garden, new Director, Marketing & Communications, Alberta College of Art + Design and Kerry Harmer, teacher and mentor of student designers.

The drinking fountain prototype is slotted into a queue:

18 October 2017, Water for Riley volunteers met the consultants again, this time to see the fabricator’s scheduling plan, and identify the right people to answer the more detailed and technical questions. The meeting goal was to nail down the information needed to proceed with the Design Assist phase.

W4R and consultants meet with a full agenda to discuss
Heavy Industries created the Plan Assist, which focused the team members on how the project will unfold and tasks for each step.
Gregory Courage (Heavy Industries), Michelle Vincent, W4R volunteer, Amanda Polini and Prasad Ganesan (IBI Group), and Kevin Poole and Connor Hayduk (Heavy Industries).

From the meeting, we have a better idea of what we don’t yet know that the Design Assist will reveal and what questions to ask. IBI Group has already connected with City of Calgary staff to get key information.

The project is getting down to the technical details.

Now, we wait for the answers to become clear, which, by Heavy Industries’ estimate, is four to five months.

None of this would happen without the wonderful funders who supply the money to pay for the fountain. We are especially grateful to The Calgary Foundation for its incredible support.

Be part of Calgary’s public art legacy;
for Riley Park, for you, and for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

 

 

Autumn fun Riley Park

The weather was so spectacular today, Riley Park was a major attraction.

Here’s a highlight list of uses observed in the brief duration of our dog walk:

  • Quidditch practice – Calgary Kelpies
  • Dog walkers
  • Full children’s playground
  • Acrobatic team practice
  • Community picnic
  • Cricket game
  • Music group
  • Walkers
  • Floral enthusiasts
  • Runners
  • Sunbathers
  • Readers
  • Bikers
  • Frisbee
  • Soccer

All those active people of all ages and ethnicities, and no public water available – YET.

Quidditch Calgary, Team Kelpies
Cricket practice in the Riley Park “bull pen”
University of Calgary soccer team practice in Riley Park’s common area
Last blooms of Riley Park

Be part of Calgary’s public art legacy;
for Riley Park, for you, and for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

 

Riley Park to have public art

While the Water for Riley volunteer committee took summer vacation, Calgary’s public art policy stayed controversial. W4R followed the debate because the drinking fountain in Riley Park will be public art.

How to recognize public art

The simple test for deciding what is public art: did an artist create it? The drinking fountain is art because an artist designed it. It’ll be in a public space. Ergo; it’s public art.

The unique aspect of Water for Riley is that its designer is a student artist. Michelle Lazo was in her first year at ACAD when she submitted her winning design, Reflecting Blooms. She’s an emerging artist, with many successes already on her resume.

The artist had a vision

Michelle has a special connection to Riley Park, which the jury didn’t know when it selected her design. Michelle, in her acceptance speech, told the crowd that her father worked for Calgary’s Parks Department. “Dad worked there. Now my thumbprint will be there too.”

She grew up going to Riley Park and loved the flowers that inspired her design. She said all the experiences came together, and she felt like she’d come full circle.

“The idea of Reflecting Blooms is to create an area in Riley Park that provides not only a hydrating space but also to engage a whimsical interaction with the sculptures.  The major inspiration for the fountain derived from the beautiful floral beds of Senator Patrick Burns Rock Garden.”

Thanks to Dana for sharing this inspiration in her photos.

Floral gardens in Riley Park. Photo credit Dana, CalgaryPlaygroundReview.com
Floral gardens Senator Patrick Burns garden. Photo credit Dana, CalgaryPlaygroundReview.com

Taste in art is subjective

As a community-based, volunteer driven project, W4R welcomes opinions about the drinking fountain’s design. Some visitors to Riley Park will appreciate and love the winning design, and, obviously, some people won’t. We look forward to being part of the larger civic discussion.

Be part of Calgary’s public art legacy;
for Riley Park, for you, and for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

Meanwhile, experts on public art comment on the controversy and one such opinion is reproduced below:

City can be a leader in investing in the arts
CALGARY HERALD
Published on: September 11, 2017

Calgary is becoming a world-class city, and art has to be part of our evolution, writes Aritha van Herk:

A part of me understands the perplexity of political candidates confronted with debates about culture, the arts, and how to value creative life here in Calgary. They are running for office, and they think about appealing to voters.

What does the average voter want? Employment, shelter, food, education. A safe city. A welcoming city. A city that can be called home, for home is where our loyalties lie. And in that equation, the arts might seem insignificant.

But there is the crux of Calgary’s future. In our current situation, we must find a way to make our home —this city — a magnet. We need people to come here, bringing their entrepreneurial talent, their intellectual wealth and their investment dollars, or we won’t get out of this rut fast.

Calgary is becoming a world-class city, and art has to be part of our evolution. We have a chance to woo the very best in the world, but we have to offer the best. If we are going to become a city where people choose to stay, enhancing our overall wealth, this is the moment to disrupt our old way of thinking, and step forward, with culture as our lodestone.

Art and culture are compasses of change, measurements of evolving economies and identities. Calgary’s character is historically both risk taking and resilient. As companies and talent adapt and innovate in these challenging times, they look to what a city can offer to collaborate with their own entrepreneurial creativity. With all that we have learned, we are positioned to become a city that leads.

Which is where culture and the arts come in. Why do we need the arts? Because they are the lifeblood of a city’s identity, the quintessential element that makes a place distinctive, a destination, a home. And we have a chance, right now, in these turbulent times, to attract the best and the brightest to bring their optimum talent, advantageous ideas and inventive designs.

Calgary is not now perceived as a competitive creative centre, which is a significant barrier to realizing our goals of a diversified and resilient economy. We must become known as a place of creative ferment, for citizens who encounter the vibrations of creative activity are better able to embrace challenge and change.

The arts contribute to our economy, often invisibly, but palpably. Every dollar invested in the arts returns almost double that amount directly and almost triple in tourism benefits. In Calgary, creative industries employ more than 50,000 citizens, and each year, more than 4,000 students in creative areas graduate with degrees from our world-class institutions.

Creativity is good; we can all agree on that. But a creative city is more than lip service. We need a bold vision for Calgary’s creative future, one that enables Calgary’s artists and arts organizations to lead nationally — and to generate the local jobs needed to retain and attract artistic talent.

Most galling of all is the fact that Edmonton’s arts grants per capita are twice as much as ours.

City hall has faltered in its chance to support the arts appropriately. But that can change: an annual investment equivalent to 0.7 per cent of the city’s budget will allow Calgary to position itself as a national leader in arts investment.

The job of artists is to create. The job of politicians is to govern. The two might seem far apart, but they have the same goal: to make this city a place where the best and the brightest come and stay.

In the upcoming civic election, voters need to remember that, and support candidates who plan to invest in our city’s future, and who know that the arts and culture are more than decoration.

Aritha van Herk is writing on behalf of Creative Calgary.

 

Who pays for public art?

Water for Riley asked the question: is the drinking fountain project public art, a public service, educational, a local community building initiative, or more than all of those? The organizing committee believes that Water for Riley encompasses all of those goals.

Water for Riley has stressed community engagement, spending almost two years consulting within and engaging diverse stakeholders of the community, to build awareness of what we are doing for Riley Park, and for our neighbourhood.

When W4R volunteers met with City of Calgary Water Services staff, we discussed this question and this answer captures our views:

Artistic drinking fountains sit in different worlds at the same time.

Art team of City of Calgary Water Services

Who pays for public art; who decides public taste in art?

This Globe and Mail story contains a cautionary tale of what Water for Riley committed to prevent, and an inspirational tale of what Water for Riley has attempted to achieve.

Now, let’s gain the support of more private sector investments to make the drinking fountain a reality.

Here’s the full article:

OPINION Public art, private dollars: Calgary, take note

  • The Globe and Mail (Alberta Edition)
  • 26 Aug 2017

Alberta’s capital is the poster child of failed, embarrassing public art projects. But there is a better way

SCOTT HENNIG Vice-president, communications for the Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Currently, more than 50 Canadian cities have a public-art program. Many of them either shake down developers to fund public art, or set aside a percentage of a government infrastructure budget for public art. Not surprisingly, the results have often been embarrassing.

Montreal has its fake granite tree stumps. Vancouver has the Main Street Poodle – a seven-foot-tall dog on a pole. Edmonton has its Talus Dome – a giant pile of shiny silver balls blinding nearby drivers on sunny days. Ottawa has the faux badminton racquet light poles in the Jack Purcell Park, honouring the wrong guy with the same name.

But Calgary is the poster child of failed, embarrassing public-art projects. Calgary’s policy of setting aside 1 per cent of each infrastructure project budget to add public art into that project has resulted in unpopular, uninspired, expensive public-art projects being erected in often obscure locations. There’s the giant blue ring called Travelling Light, a LED light display on the side of a waste-water lift station, and Bearing, a large, round metal ball that can only be viewed from inside a fenced-off fire-department maintenance yard. We can’t forget Wishing Well, a shiny interactive metal statue that is now in storage because it burned a hole in a visitor’s jacket. And now, the city has Bowfort Towers, which is so controversial that the area’s city councillor wants it torn down.

Some critics have suggested tweaking the selection process for public art to ensure better outcomes, but perhaps we should look to the Wynwood neighbourhood of Miami for some real direction.

Formerly the inner-city garment district in the mid-20th century, Wynwood was home to a mix of blue- and white-collar workers. But over the second half of the past century, it slowly deteriorated into a slum of worn down homes and impoverished citizens with few job prospects. Race riots and drug busts were not uncommon in the 1990s and businesses fled the area.

However, in the mid-2000s, land developer Tony Goldman saw a real opportunity. Known for his contribution to the redevelopment of New York’s SoHo neighbourhood and Miami Beach, Mr. Goldman bought cheap property in Wynwood – both retail and large warehouses. Between 2004 and 2005, Goldman purchased more than 25 Wynwood properties.

In 2008, Mr. Goldman realized that his large, windowless warehouse walls were the perfect canvas for street art – graffiti. He offered free airfare, accommodations, supplies and a giant canvas to some of the world’s most famous graffiti artists to showcase their work. Dozens took him up on his offer and turned his drab buildings into beautiful works of art. And thus, Wynwood Walls was born.

Now the centrepiece of the neighbourhood, Wynwood Walls is an outdoor, public museum of street art. Artists from around the world now compete to install their work on the walls. Its popularity with tourists has forced Goldman Properties (run by his daughter Jessica after Tony died in 2012) to expand, using shipping containers as canvases where warehouse walls don’t exist.

More impressive than the art itself is what happened in the surrounding area. Neighbouring businesses followed suit, commissioning artwork on their building walls. Today, nearly every building in the neighbourhood has a wall or two adorned with street art.

Since 2008, property values have shot up. Retail spaces that once rented for $10 per square foot now fetch eight times that amount. And warehouses that would have sold for $40 per square foot now sell for as much as $400 per square foot.

Crime rates have plummeted and both retail and residential development have made Wynwood one of Miami’s hot spots. Vogue magazine named Wynwood one of “the world’s coolest neighbourhoods,” and Forbes magazine named Wynwood to its list of “American’s best hipster neighbourhoods.”

All of this occurred because private business owners invested in public art.

Similarly, the most photographed piece of public art in Calgary – the Wonderland sculpture (the 12-metre-high grid-like head) at the Bow Building – was entirely funded by Encana Corporation and Cenovus Energy, not taxpayers.

Miami’s Wynwood Walls cannot be replicated by governments using tax dollars. It can only be replicated by those with skin in the game. Public art has the ability to create tremendous benefit.

The Walls have shown that tourists, citizens, land developers and the city all benefit when the private sector takes the lead on public art.

Calgary’s policy of setting aside 1 per cent of each infrastructure project budget to add public art into that project has resulted in unpopular, uninspired, expensive public-art projects being erected in often obscure locations.

If other cities can do public art better, so can Calgary. The winning drinking fountain design would be beautiful in any setting, and it’s going in Riley Park.

Be part of it;
a beautiful public drinking fountain,
for Riley Park, for you and as a legacy for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

 

When art goes to the dogs

While only one bloom of the Reflecting Blooms drinking fountain is for pets, the article below lets Calgary’s animal lovers know they are not alone. New York shares the love.

How appropriate that the Basset Hound’s name is Riley!

WHEN ART GOES TO THE DOGS

Calgary Herald
Aug 19, 2017

New York City ex­hibit tar­gets ca­nines
FRANK ELTMAN

Riley, a basset hound, exits Noah Scalin’s The Hand That Feeds. There weren’t any pictures of dogs playing poker at DoGUMENTA

A recent three-day art exhibition for dogs attracted hundreds of canines to a marina in Lower Manhattan, where hounds and terriers feasted their eyes, and in some cases their mouths, on nearly a dozen masterpieces created expressly for them.

The idea was the brainchild of former Washington Post art critic Jessica Dawson, who says she was inspired by her rescue dog Rocky, a tiny morkie ( Yorkie-Maltese mix), who regularly joins her at exhibits of the human variety.

“When Rocky accompanied me on my gallery visits, I noticed he was having a much better time than I was,” said Dawson, who moved to New York four years ago. “He was not reading the New York Times reviews, he was not reading the artists’ resumés, and so I said he has something to teach me about looking. All dogs have something to teach us about looking at contemporary art and being with it.”

Organizers of the exhibit — which takes its name from Documenta, held every five years in Kassel, Germany — and put on by Arts at Brookfield, staggered the arrival times of the dogs to keep things orderly.

“I think she’s enjoying it,” said Lorraine Gates, who attended with her tiny Japanese chin, Maltese and Papillon mix. “I love this idea. I think it’s really wonderful.”

The 10 works of art at the outdoor exhibit were all strategically placed at eye level for the canines. One featured an elaborate display of dog biscuits and other treats that attendees were invited to munch on.

At another exhibit, four-legged art critics were lifting their hind legs and “expressing” themselves on a work called Fountain. As the dogs left their marks, scribbles of blue streaks were left behind on the white blocks.

Dawson said Rocky visited several times.

Susan Godwin and her morkie, Tasha, soaked up the art vibes.

“This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” Godwin said. “You can go to museums all over New York and you can never bring your dog.”

This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. You can go to museums all over New York and you can never bring your dog.

If New York can do it, so can Calgary.

Be part of it;
a beautiful public drinking fountain,
for Riley Park, for you and as a legacy for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

Need accessible drinking water

Water for Riley understands the Riders fans’ complaints (see story below). Please support a public drinking fountain for Riley Park. This important quote tells the consequence of no access to drinking water, when 21 fans became ill at a game.

Gerald Heinrichs sent letters to the Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region’s senior medical health officer and the province’s chief medical health officer suggesting dehydration accounted for the injuries. He believes the lack of water fountains at Mosaic Stadium poses a serious public health risk and the facility should not be permitted to hold events until it is remedied.

Be part of it;
a beautiful public drinking fountain,
for Riley Park, for you and as a legacy for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

Here’s the full story:

Fans pan shortage of drinking fountains
as mercury hits 35 C during Riders game

A fan who complained to health officials in Regina is questioning whether Mosaic Stadium operators are willfully restricting public water access so they can sell water for profit.

In the aftermath of a REGINA scorching hot Saskatchewan Roughriders game on July 29 when 21 fans were treated for heat-related symptoms, the City of Regina and Evraz Place are discussing an extreme weather plan for all events at Mosaic Stadium.

Fans were hot about the lack of water fountains at the stadium on a day when the mercury registered 35 degrees at kickoff.

“We’re looking at having … an extreme weather plan that could be implemented when temperatures rise above or below a certain temperature,” said Kim Onrait, executive director of city services and major projects.

“If the forecast would be similar to what we saw that particular day, then they would have a plan that they would implement, which could very well be bringing in portable water filling stations for people to access.”

Of the 21 fans who became ill, two required transport to hospital and six were managed by St. John Ambulance.

The majority of those affected required fluids and cooling by paramedics and were then released.

Gerald Heinrichs sent letters to the Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region’s senior medical health officer and the province’s chief medical health officer suggesting dehydration accounted for the injuries. He believes the lack of water fountains at Mosaic Stadium poses a serious public health risk and the facility should not be permitted to hold events until it is remedied.

“This stadium brings in 30,000 to 35,000 people and they had no reasonable access to public water,” Heinrichs said.

The design of the stadium was done by PCL and their subcontracting group.

“When they build a facility like this, they build it to meet national building codes and that’s the way this stadium was designed,” Onrait said. “We have received a permanent occupancy permit for the stadium, which says that we have met all of the health inspections and we’ve also met the national building code requirements.”

Heinrichs questions if the stadium operators are willfully restricting public water access so they can sell water for profit.

“It is important that we work … to ensure that eventgoers have the right information about what they’re allowed to bring into the stadium,” Onrait said.

Patrons attending events at Mosaic Stadium are permitted to bring sealed water bottles no larger than one litre, as well as empty refillable containers with a one-litre maximum capacity. There is no limit on the number of sealed water bottles or refillable containers allowed at Mosaic Stadium.

“A lot of stadiums restrict bringing in water or containers, they have higher restrictions on those items than Mosaic actually has,” Onrait said.

He discourages fans from filling water bottles from sinks in washrooms.

“The hot and cold water come into a single line just before the tap and hot water can carry contaminants in it, so we don’t recommend that people resort to doing that,” Onrait said.

At Investors Group Field in Winnipeg, there are six water fountains and four portable water dispensers. There is no charge to refill water bottles. The Winnipeg stadium, which has 33,234 seats that can be expanded to 40,000, hosted its first game in 2013.

McMahon Stadium in Calgary has no water fountains or bottle refill stations. However, fans can bring in bottled water and fill bottles with potable water at any of the sinks in the washrooms of the 57-year-old stadium. The Calgary stadium seats 35,400.

There are eight combination water fountains/bottle refill stations at Tim Hortons Field in Hamilton. Opening in 2014, the stadium has 22,500 seats.

At TD Place in Ottawa, there are water fountains and refillable stations in all public areas and water in the bathrooms is drinkable everywhere in the 24,000-seat stadium.

Fans are also permitted to bring in empty drink containers for CFL games so they can refill inside or bring in sealed water bottles.

This stadium brings in 30,000 to 35,000 people and they had no reasonable access to public water. Calgary can do better.

Be part of it;
a beautiful public drinking fountain,
for Riley Park, for you and as a legacy for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

 

What happens to bottles and cans discarded in Riley Park?

Environmental stewardship remains an obvious goal

Disposable cans and bottles are discarded in Riley Park’s trash, and litter the fence and bushes. It’s an unsustainable waste of resources, which doesn’t fit with W4R’s five guiding goals:

1. Health, 2. Environment, 3. Community building, 4. Economic well being of local businesses, and 5. Other collective benefits.

For some time, W4R has attempted to find out (1) how much garbage is collected at Riley Park, and,  (2) how much of that is disposable drink containers that could be recycled. We learned that garbage collection is contracted out, so no records are available to answer either question.

The reasons for wanting that data

Although the amount of garbage is visible, having numbers, such as garbage weight or bag count carted out weekly, is very helpful in making a case for funding the drinking fountain, and for raising awareness of the issues of waste.

What we did learn, is that City of Calgary staff take the initiative on their own. If staff find recyclables in the park, they can and often do collect them.

What do they do with the refunds they collect from Riley Park’s disposable bottles and cans? According to Leanne, the refund from any cans and bottles is donated to the Parks staff fund.

W4R is pleased that Riley Park’s waste doesn’t go to waste.

Leanne, City of Calgary Parks Department, works in Riley Park

Be part of it;
a beautiful public drinking fountain,
for Riley Park, for you and as a legacy for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

 

 

Nice drinking fountain design; will it work?

The Calgary Foundation Neighbours Grant

When Water for Riley (W4R) was just an idea without a name, two community members met with Julie Black, The Calgary Foundation’s fantastic Citizen Engagement Associate. From the start, Julie and The Calgary Foundation (TCF) provided financial support as well as excellent advice, encouragement, and other opportunities.

Julie Black and Deborah Sword, volunteer Project Manager of W4R.

Once again, we are excited and delighted to announce that TCF has awarded us a Neighbours Grant to fund the building of the drinking fountain’s prototype. W4R and the fundraising committee want to shout out our gratitude.

W4R is proud to partner with and accept support from The Calgary Foundation.

To find out how Reflecting Blooms works we’ll build it

Taking risks is how W4R achieved the success it’s had so far. Bring on the next challenge. With a winning design and a fundraising plan, we’ve retained a fabricator and mechanical engineer.

W4R relies on community volunteers. The next steps will rely on professionals. We are very pleased that the expert firms we’re working with have committed to contain costs, and to give us fixed, reasonable prices to move ahead in increments, as funds are available.

Next step is the design build

Design–build is a method to deliver a project.

“Design-build is intended to be a highly collaborative, fully integrated process that is built on trust, mutual respect, teamwork, innovation and creative problem solving. Design-build unleashes the power of team to deliver projects faster, better and for optimum cost – best value for the money, time and e ort invested. Owners find that when design-build is done right, their level of engagement with the entire team is more meaningful than is experienced with other delivery methods.” https://www.dbia.org

Be part of it;
a beautiful public drinking fountain,
for Riley Park, for you and as a legacy for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.