First concept sketches

The second fabrication step is underway

First, the fabrication team met to share the vision, assign tasks, and ensure everyone understood the project. Now, the project is with the fabricator for design specifications, and the engineers for location and mechanical specifications. Once their drawings have received official stamps (a professional sign off protocol), the building begins.

There were hiccups and surprises

Delays on a few of the many details were noted in a blog post dated 1 August, 2018. A lot of what Water for Riley is doing hasn’t been done quite this way ever before. The whole team is committed to solving the problems, which W4R greatly appreciates.

Celebrating the drinking fountain installation

The best estimate for the drinking fountain installation is Spring 2019. W4R’s excellent partner and major donor, NWHP REIT, is looking forward to co-hosting the opening celebration.

Terry Schmitt, Regional General Manager, NorthWest Healthcare Properties REIT, and Gena Rotstein, Chief Conversationalist, Place2Give Foundation, celebrate the generous donation.

What the Plan Assist does

Here are first sketches that clarify one part of the fabricator’s scope of work. Heavy Industries is the Prime Contractor and endlessly helpful to the W4R volunteers.

ACAD student designer, Michelle Lazo, has a vision of an organic bouquet of Reflecting Blooms rising from the soil of Riley Park.

Be part of Calgary’s public art legacy;
for Riley Park, for you, and for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for The Water for Riley Project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

Riley Park drinking fountain: real & local

Water for Riley has made progress after months of effort. Calgary is known for its talents, resilience, and entrepreneurship. The funding, and the expertise that designed, guided, managed, created, planned, and is fabricating the drinking fountain are local. When the installed drinking fountain is celebrated, Calgary, especially the Parks Department, can take a lot of credit.

The teams are coordinating

The fabricators (Heavy Industries), mechanical engineers installing the plumbing (TLJ), civil engineers (IBI Group,Calgary office), the City of Calgary (Parks Department) and the student designer, have met to check plans, go over designs, solve issues, and review the Risk Assessments.

The experts agreed on many of the details and tasks to be completed:

  • The risk assessment concluded that the depth of the petal relief held the potential for fountain users to get heads or limbs stuck. The artist agreed that the profile of the flower petals be smoothed out as a solution. Also, a brushed finish for the stainless-steel components will reduce the likelihood of reflections.
  • TLJ has presented a mechanical engineering proposal for Heavy Industries to review.
  • TLJ is putting together a preliminary mechanical design and hardware list of the internal components for the drinking fountain.
  • IBI will review the project with City Parks-Water Management Division to confirm the service location in Riley Park, and then IBI will prepare a site servicing plan.

Heavy Industries is working to revise and develop the design and pricing, and will soon provide Water for Riley with a solid plan, budget, and schedule for moving forward!

The funders made it possible

W4R received broad community support in small amounts, from generous Calgary Foundation and Government of Alberta grants, and large donations in kind. Without NWHP REIT, W4R would struggle to pay for all that’s been achieved.

Tracy Hume and Terry Schmitt
Many thanks to Tracy Hume and Terry Schmidt, who championed the donation from their NWHP REIT Calgary office.

NWHP REIT’s large donation arrived at Parks Foundation Calgary, which is W4R’s fiscal agent.

cheque 50K from NWHPR

 

Heartfelt gratitude to the wonderful Water for Riley team of specialists and donors.

Be part of Calgary’s public art legacy;
for Riley Park, for you, and for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for The Water for Riley Project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

Opinion of the design

Community engagement is part of Water for Riley (W4R)

W4R encourages community input. This comment came through this site’s contact page, as well as The Parks Foundation Facebook page. W4R shares it in hopes you will join the discussion.

What do you see in the drinking fountain design, “Reflecting Blooms?

The writer, Dave, raised two main concerns, and gave a compliment:

  1. The drinking fountain design. The city is experiencing an opiate crisis and you are putting a fountain that resembles opium poppy heads in a family friendly park?  Beyond the fact it may trigger addicts, it is terrible metaprograming for the kids. I object to a design that references opiates.

W4R replies: We should all be concerned about opiates. However, not all flowers with petals are opium producing poppies. There are over 50 varieties of poppies, according to https://www.britannica.com/plant/poppy, many looking little like the fountain design aside from having petals.

Nor was opiate-bearing poppy in the mind of the student designer. In her description of the design, she stated she took her inspiration from the floral beauty of the park flower beds, and opiate poppies aren’t planted there, so her design’s intention doesn’t reference opiates.

  1. Shading from the sun. This is the problem with the existing fountain, the water is warm because it is often in direct sunlight.

W4R repliesThe City of Calgary decided on the site for the drinking fountain in Riley Park. The City of Calgary has to connect the fountain to a water line that already exists. Also, the drinking fountain should be accessible to the open areas and playground and the new bandstand for the health of the children and music lovers. Fortunately, lovely mature trees shade the site selected.

And now, Dave’s compliment: I love the idea of fountains in parks. Thank you for this initiative, this is a great opportunity to add value to the community through functional art, just please be mindful of the subconscious message it conveys.

W4R replies: Thank you, Dave, for the insightful comments. We hope this addresses your concern, and are glad you like the idea of a drinking fountain in the park, especially where no potable water source currently exists.

Be part of Calgary’s public art legacy;
for Riley Park, for you, and for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for The Water for Riley Project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

A standard contract in non-standard parts

Like NAFTA negotiations, Water for Riley (W4R) is a tri-party contracting effort, which was supposed to be fast and simple, until complications happened.

The unexpected complications

The standard contract that Heavy Industries (HI) usually signs with its clients just didn’t apply to this project. Because W4R is unique, three of the contract clauses needed revisions.

Fortunately, W4R’s amazing partners at the City of Calgary Parks Department and HI understood the issues that W4R had with the contract and worked hard to make the necessary changes. Back to the NAFTA metaphor, we parsed legal language from October, 2017, to July, 2018.

W4R is an ad hoc group of volunteers

W4R owns nothing and has accomplished much. W4R exists to:

The solution in two parts

HI and the City of Calgary really came through for us.

First, HI revised some clauses in the contract. HI is a world-class company, whose clients include well-known artists and corporations. Yet, HI gives our local drinking fountain the same consideration, attention, and time it does to its multi-million dollar international projects.

Second, HI and the City of Calgary agreed to (a) split HI’s standard contract into two phases with known start and end dates; and (b) HI will sign the City of Calgary’s standard documentation for any work it undertakes for the City of Calgary.

The first phase contract, which W4R signed, starts now. It ends when the drinking fountain is fabricated, in a crate, and loaded on the truck on HI property, before the loaded truck’s wheels roll.

The contract was signed 9 July, 2018, setting the stage for HI to begin its work.

The second phase contract, which HI and the City of Calgary will sign, starts when the loaded truck’s wheels roll. Phase two covers installing the drinking fountain in Riley Park.

Water for Riley is incredibly grateful for this flexibility in the standard practices of both HI and the City of Calgary.

Be part of Calgary’s public art legacy;
for Riley Park, for you, and for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for The Water for Riley Project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

See the W4R story in ACAD’s video

ACAD’s creative W4R story

ACAD captures W4R in video

W4R followed its own unique structure and process. ACAD’s Director, Marketing & Communications, Marion Garden, thought W4R had a great story. She found the right, amazing people to tell it.

W4R’s story is now online

Kenzie Webber

Kenzie WebberACAD‘s talented Digital Content Coordinator,  shaped the story of how W4R brought institutions together, engaged community, and gave students a real-world, client experience.

At several stages, ACAD videographers filmed W4R’s special events. Kenzie features that ACAD footage and this blog’s images in the short video.

Steven Hodges, ACAD‘s Community Engagement Strategist, liaised with W4R volunteers during the editing process.

Please share the link to the video about W4R’s story https://youtu.be/1ZKjAIab3Bs

Be part of Calgary’s public art legacy;
for Riley Park, for you, and for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

 

 

Riley Park’s new bandstand

Thank you, City of Calgary Parks Department

Water for Riley has enjoyed a productive relationship with staff of the City of Calgary Parks Department. From the beginning of the project, Councillor Farrell, Ron Buchan and Michelle Reid understood the vision to bring a student-designed, artistic, functional drinking fountain to Riley Park.

W4R has accomplished so much and it wouldn’t have happened without their support.

Michelle Reid, Councillor Druh Farrell, and Ron Buchan meet with Michelle Vincent, lead W4R volunteer.

Coming soon to Riley Park, again courtesy of Parks Department

For years, the only remnant of the prior bandstand was its concrete footprint, like a dinosaur print preserved in clay.

March, 2017, all that remained of the bandstand in Riley Park was this concrete pad.

Now, the bandstand rises again

April, 2018

A new permanent bandstand on the concrete pad replaces one that Nature destroyed.

Located near the new children’s playground, the bandstand will provide shelter and entertainment. This cluster of activities sorely needs drinking water. The drinking fountain will provide that water to thirsty entertainers and their audiences.

With the playground, activities and the wading pool drawing children and families to Riley Park, a drinking fountain is ever more important. Fortunately, with the help of W4R’s wonderful partners and sponsors, the drinking fountain also draws ever nearer in time.

Be part of Calgary’s public art legacy;
for Riley Park, for you, and for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

 

How a great community grows

Why are Water for Riley (W4R) volunteers working so hard to bring a drinking fountain to Riley Park?

Simple answer: Hillhurst Sunnyside (HS) is a terrific community, in every sense of the word community. While the community grows in population, with new developments and densification, it isn’t adding services. W4R aims to add one service to Riley Park, to accommodate the growth in HS residents.

As a member of the Federation of Calgary Communities, our HS community, especially the volunteers, live the “resident-led solutions” motto. W4R is a totally resident led effort.

W4R volunteers too often let social media slide, spending valuable hours on guiding the fabrication of the drinking fountain, dealing with finances, interpreting contract language, and fundraising. Social media fell to the bottom of the to-do list.

Thanks to W4R’s relationship with HSCA, we gratefully piggy back on HSCA social media to have this reach:
HSCA Website Page Views: 6734
Facebook Likes: 1718 increased 20
Twitter Followers: 3589 increased 25
Instagram Followers: 857 increased 25
Newsletter Subscribers: 1936 decreased 7

Social media is important for staying connected to the people who will benefit from the drinking fountain. Here are some interesting statistics about how to connect:

What can you do? Join a local community association for the connections and the other benefits, like discounts at local businesses, taking programs, and making new friends. Better yet – donate to W4R.

Be part of Calgary’s public art legacy;
for Riley Park, for you, and for the future.

Donate to make this vision a reality at the Parks Foundation Calgary. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to volunteer. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

To all donors, supporters, partners and friends, thank you from the volunteers of Water for Riley.

 

Autumn fun Riley Park

The weather was so spectacular today, Riley Park was a major attraction.

Here’s a highlight list of uses observed in the brief duration of our dog walk:

  • Quidditch practice – Calgary Kelpies
  • Dog walkers
  • Full children’s playground
  • Acrobatic team practice
  • Community picnic
  • Cricket game
  • Music group
  • Walkers
  • Floral enthusiasts
  • Runners
  • Sunbathers
  • Readers
  • Bikers
  • Frisbee
  • Soccer

All those active people of all ages and ethnicities, and no public water available – YET.

Quidditch Calgary, Team Kelpies
Cricket practice in the Riley Park “bull pen”
University of Calgary soccer team practice in Riley Park’s common area
Last blooms of Riley Park

Be part of Calgary’s public art legacy;
for Riley Park, for you, and for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

 

Riley Park to have public art

While the Water for Riley volunteer committee took summer vacation, Calgary’s public art policy stayed controversial. W4R followed the debate because the drinking fountain in Riley Park will be public art.

How to recognize public art

The simple test for deciding what is public art: did an artist create it? The drinking fountain is art because an artist designed it. It’ll be in a public space. Ergo; it’s public art.

The unique aspect of Water for Riley is that its designer is a student artist. Michelle Lazo was in her first year at ACAD when she submitted her winning design, Reflecting Blooms. She’s an emerging artist, with many successes already on her resume.

The artist had a vision

Michelle has a special connection to Riley Park, which the jury didn’t know when it selected her design. Michelle, in her acceptance speech, told the crowd that her father worked for Calgary’s Parks Department. “Dad worked there. Now my thumbprint will be there too.”

She grew up going to Riley Park and loved the flowers that inspired her design. She said all the experiences came together, and she felt like she’d come full circle.

“The idea of Reflecting Blooms is to create an area in Riley Park that provides not only a hydrating space but also to engage a whimsical interaction with the sculptures.  The major inspiration for the fountain derived from the beautiful floral beds of Senator Patrick Burns Rock Garden.”

Thanks to Dana for sharing this inspiration in her photos.

Floral gardens in Riley Park. Photo credit Dana, CalgaryPlaygroundReview.com
Floral gardens Senator Patrick Burns garden. Photo credit Dana, CalgaryPlaygroundReview.com

Taste in art is subjective

As a community-based, volunteer driven project, W4R welcomes opinions about the drinking fountain’s design. Some visitors to Riley Park will appreciate and love the winning design, and, obviously, some people won’t. We look forward to being part of the larger civic discussion.

Be part of Calgary’s public art legacy;
for Riley Park, for you, and for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.

Meanwhile, experts on public art comment on the controversy and one such opinion is reproduced below:

City can be a leader in investing in the arts
CALGARY HERALD
Published on: September 11, 2017

Calgary is becoming a world-class city, and art has to be part of our evolution, writes Aritha van Herk:

A part of me understands the perplexity of political candidates confronted with debates about culture, the arts, and how to value creative life here in Calgary. They are running for office, and they think about appealing to voters.

What does the average voter want? Employment, shelter, food, education. A safe city. A welcoming city. A city that can be called home, for home is where our loyalties lie. And in that equation, the arts might seem insignificant.

But there is the crux of Calgary’s future. In our current situation, we must find a way to make our home —this city — a magnet. We need people to come here, bringing their entrepreneurial talent, their intellectual wealth and their investment dollars, or we won’t get out of this rut fast.

Calgary is becoming a world-class city, and art has to be part of our evolution. We have a chance to woo the very best in the world, but we have to offer the best. If we are going to become a city where people choose to stay, enhancing our overall wealth, this is the moment to disrupt our old way of thinking, and step forward, with culture as our lodestone.

Art and culture are compasses of change, measurements of evolving economies and identities. Calgary’s character is historically both risk taking and resilient. As companies and talent adapt and innovate in these challenging times, they look to what a city can offer to collaborate with their own entrepreneurial creativity. With all that we have learned, we are positioned to become a city that leads.

Which is where culture and the arts come in. Why do we need the arts? Because they are the lifeblood of a city’s identity, the quintessential element that makes a place distinctive, a destination, a home. And we have a chance, right now, in these turbulent times, to attract the best and the brightest to bring their optimum talent, advantageous ideas and inventive designs.

Calgary is not now perceived as a competitive creative centre, which is a significant barrier to realizing our goals of a diversified and resilient economy. We must become known as a place of creative ferment, for citizens who encounter the vibrations of creative activity are better able to embrace challenge and change.

The arts contribute to our economy, often invisibly, but palpably. Every dollar invested in the arts returns almost double that amount directly and almost triple in tourism benefits. In Calgary, creative industries employ more than 50,000 citizens, and each year, more than 4,000 students in creative areas graduate with degrees from our world-class institutions.

Creativity is good; we can all agree on that. But a creative city is more than lip service. We need a bold vision for Calgary’s creative future, one that enables Calgary’s artists and arts organizations to lead nationally — and to generate the local jobs needed to retain and attract artistic talent.

Most galling of all is the fact that Edmonton’s arts grants per capita are twice as much as ours.

City hall has faltered in its chance to support the arts appropriately. But that can change: an annual investment equivalent to 0.7 per cent of the city’s budget will allow Calgary to position itself as a national leader in arts investment.

The job of artists is to create. The job of politicians is to govern. The two might seem far apart, but they have the same goal: to make this city a place where the best and the brightest come and stay.

In the upcoming civic election, voters need to remember that, and support candidates who plan to invest in our city’s future, and who know that the arts and culture are more than decoration.

Aritha van Herk is writing on behalf of Creative Calgary.

 

When art goes to the dogs

While only one bloom of the Reflecting Blooms drinking fountain is for pets, the article below lets Calgary’s animal lovers know they are not alone. New York shares the love.

How appropriate that the Basset Hound’s name is Riley!

WHEN ART GOES TO THE DOGS

Calgary Herald
Aug 19, 2017

New York City ex­hibit tar­gets ca­nines
FRANK ELTMAN

Riley, a basset hound, exits Noah Scalin’s The Hand That Feeds. There weren’t any pictures of dogs playing poker at DoGUMENTA

A recent three-day art exhibition for dogs attracted hundreds of canines to a marina in Lower Manhattan, where hounds and terriers feasted their eyes, and in some cases their mouths, on nearly a dozen masterpieces created expressly for them.

The idea was the brainchild of former Washington Post art critic Jessica Dawson, who says she was inspired by her rescue dog Rocky, a tiny morkie ( Yorkie-Maltese mix), who regularly joins her at exhibits of the human variety.

“When Rocky accompanied me on my gallery visits, I noticed he was having a much better time than I was,” said Dawson, who moved to New York four years ago. “He was not reading the New York Times reviews, he was not reading the artists’ resumés, and so I said he has something to teach me about looking. All dogs have something to teach us about looking at contemporary art and being with it.”

Organizers of the exhibit — which takes its name from Documenta, held every five years in Kassel, Germany — and put on by Arts at Brookfield, staggered the arrival times of the dogs to keep things orderly.

“I think she’s enjoying it,” said Lorraine Gates, who attended with her tiny Japanese chin, Maltese and Papillon mix. “I love this idea. I think it’s really wonderful.”

The 10 works of art at the outdoor exhibit were all strategically placed at eye level for the canines. One featured an elaborate display of dog biscuits and other treats that attendees were invited to munch on.

At another exhibit, four-legged art critics were lifting their hind legs and “expressing” themselves on a work called Fountain. As the dogs left their marks, scribbles of blue streaks were left behind on the white blocks.

Dawson said Rocky visited several times.

Susan Godwin and her morkie, Tasha, soaked up the art vibes.

“This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” Godwin said. “You can go to museums all over New York and you can never bring your dog.”

This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. You can go to museums all over New York and you can never bring your dog.

If New York can do it, so can Calgary.

Be part of it;
a beautiful public drinking fountain,
for Riley Park, for you and as a legacy for the future.

Donate to make this vision become reality. At the instructions to seller page, specify that your support is for Water for Riley project. The Parks Foundation issues tax receipts for donations greater than $10.00.

We invite everyone to participate as a volunteer organizer, fundraiser, donor, sponsor, or any other role. Call 403 862 1923 and leave your contact information.